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Ferrari Modulo Concept Catches Fire, Keeps On Going

Automotive–and Ferrari–aficionado and ex-movie producer James Glickenhaus recently took his Ferrari Modulo for a drive on the mountain roads outside of Monaco when its exhaust system caught fire. Fortunately for Glickenhaus, the car had an onboard fire suppression system which he activated, killing the flames and damaging only the bodywork around the muffler at the rear and a section of the right rear fender.

 

With the fire out and after a careful check of the car for any other damages, Glickenhaus and the Modulo then went on their merry way.

 

In 2014, Glickenhaus acquired the Ferrari Modulo from Italian coachbuilder Pininfarina. One of the stars of the 1970 Geneva Motor Show, the Modulo is a concept car based on the Ferrari 512 S race car–chassis and engine #27–but with its mechanical underpinings removed once it became a show car.

 

Prior to Mahindra’s acquisition of Pininfarina, Glickenhaus managed to acquire it and bring it back to life and as close to its original running state as possible. Apparently, that involved hiring a designer for its exhaust system that Glickenhaus said his company doesn’t work with anymore–perhaps to assuage the fears of the customers of his cars, like the SCG003, SCG004S, and the SCG Boot. It’s a good thing that Glockenhaus fitted it with the said onboard fire suppression system as it would be a shame to lose a one-off that still looks as great as the day it debuted in Geneva 49 year ago.

As for the car’s repair, that shouldn’t be a problem for Glickenhaus. He does run his own race team–which took ninth place overall at the recently-concluded 24 Hours of Nurburgring endurance race, which is not a bad effort for a small-scale factory team that went up against motorsport giants like Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, and BMW–and produces a limited number of bespoke cars for select customers. Let’s just hope that his acquisition of the Modulo included the wooden form that was used to mold the car’s shape into the finished product we see now.

Photo by Morio for Wikimedia Commons
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